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Indian industrial school, Carlisle, Pa

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Indian industrial school, Carlisle, Pa


Published 1895
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Publisher [Philadelphia?]
Year 1895
Pages 72
Language English
Call number 31735037840117
Digitizing sponsor University of Pittsburgh Library System
Book contributor University of Pittsburgh Library System
Collection university_pittsburgh; americana

Full catalog record MARCXML

[Open Library icon]This book has an editable web page on Open Library.

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Reviews

Reviewer: Ved036 - favoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - November 16, 2013
Subject: Review of a review!
This illustrated book is good for those who wish to see the endeavours of an English pioneering-population trying to spread their own positive sides to others.

However, my review is not aimed at the book, but at the reviewer Grahams who writes with a conceit and arrogance of unintelligence. This unintelligence now more or less widespread in English nations.

I write from India, the nation in the East. I could be mentioned as belonging to the Stolen generation of this geographical region. In that, the native ways of dressing of the lower castes, the suppressed social living and the terror of the pejorative part of the local feudal vernaculars were more or less removed from my family by the entry of the English rule in Malabar. Yet, no one of the modern generations around here knows any of these things. For they learn of the ‘terrible’ exploitative rule of the English.

The reviewer Graham has written about the Victorian Paternalism, without really known what was the social reality of the other side. When a refined population tries to improve a social system that has negativities, the negativities would seep into the tutoring side also. It is almost 100% possible that the Native Indian (US) languages were feudal and had pejorative versus ennobling word codes. The effect of this cannot be conveyed in English. As to Victorian Paternalism, this is a word used with senseless ingratitude. All that the US has of some bearing is the traditions and system of England. Wherever these systems have entered the nations have improved.
Graham asks thus: QUOTE: no attempt has been made to portray past or the then present Indian cultural heritage or whether Indians were happy at being integrated into a Western industrial society in such a prescriptive manner. END OF QUOTE

The fact is that this is the tone of so many jingoists mentioning that English language and systems were forced on the natives of the Indian Peninsula. Yet, those who received it do know its golden value. Yet, they may try to mislead others here, by telling them not to learn English and English system.

What the Continental Europeans, the Negros, the Native Indians, the Asians and the rest received in the US in the form of an English social ambiance is actually of priceless value. But then they all received it too cheap. And are not willing to acknowledge its value. Just to mention the English antiquity directly connected to England has become a shame for many US citizens.
Actually no other nation would so foolish as was England to divulge all her own knowledge and information to all others. Actually what is described as Victorian Paternalism would never come anywhere near to the cunningness of the native Indian (nation) social dominators as they took all efforts to see that other populations under them never improved. Even now. See this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmEI8pHN3as If anyone were to ask the Indians (from the Eastern nation) of how is India, they might say that it is a great nation. Well, the truth is that they are the dominators. For the around 80% of the population which you would see in this video, Victorian Paternalism would be much better than modern Indian rule.

I can’t write more here. Interested persons can read my own book: SHROUDED SATANISM in FEUDAL LANGUAGES; Tribulations and intractability of improving others from this link. https://archive.org/details/Shroude
Reviewer: Graham W - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - April 8, 2010
Subject: A fascinating cultural and historical time capsule from the late 19th Century.
 
This 'coffee-table' book is a fascinating cultural and historical time capsule from the late 19th Century (1895). It pictorially depicts many aspects of daily life of students, teachers and workers in and around a purpose-built industrial school* for Native Americans in Carlisle, Pa.

It is packed full with detailed full-page photographs that enable the 21st C. reader to drop into the lives of a long-forgotten world of 115 years ago. The photographs show the school, its students, classrooms, industrial classrooms and trades workshops such as carpenters' shop etc. For example, there are some excellent depictions of students working in the school's printing and typesetting workshops. The reader can even view kitchens, living quarters, building fittings (including the boiler room) in considerable detail.

Whether intentional or not, this book is a proud historical record from that time: of how American can-do felt capable and assured of integrating the Indian into the American way of life. It overflows with well meaning sentiment and late-19 C. Victorian paternalism. Nevertheless, in this regard the book should not be singled out as being exceptional or paternalistic as it was not so back then. As well as being an important historical document, it must be read within the context of that time.

What is patently obvious from our modern perspective is that no attempt has been made to portray past or the then present Indian cultural heritage or whether Indians were happy at being integrated into a Western industrial society in such a prescriptive manner.

So infused within the culture of the late Victorian period were notions of Western industrial society being the pinnacle of human endeavor that any serious consideration of Indian cultures as being worthy or equal would have been a non sequitur. Therefore, to fully appreciate this wonderful little book, modern readers must have some awareness and cognizance of the 1890s zeitgeist.

This book will be of interest to a wide range of readers from historians and sociologists through to photographers and industrial archaeologists.

A gem of historical significance, I highly recommend it.



* The school is more the size of a small university campus.
 
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